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Public Statements

Fetus Farming Prohibition Act of 2006

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC


FETUS FARMING PROHIBITION ACT OF 2006 -- (Senate - July 17, 2006)

BREAK IN TRANSCRIPT

Mr. CHAMBLISS. Mr. President, I rise today to speak about stem cell research. This is a very delicate and very tough issue and these are difficult decisions that we will all have to make this week.

Some scientists believe that advancement in research requires the creation and development of new embryonic stem cell lines. The truth of the matter is that there are very promising alternatives to embryonic stem cell research, such as stem cells from adult tissue like bone marrow and umbilical cord blood. These cells have repeatedly demonstrated the capability of turning into most tissue types providing the basis for advanced research to find cures for many diseases, including leukemia, Parkinson's disease, juvenile diabetes, sickle cell anemia, heart disease and spinal cord injuries. To date, we have seen promising results coming from the research that has been conducted on these types of cells. Doctors have successfully treated 69 diseases and injuries using adult stem cells such as Lupus, arthritis, liver damage, brain tumors and various forms of cancer. It is vital that we continue to conduct important medical research and continue producing these types of results providing hope for patients and their families.

I am very thankful for the accomplishments that have been made in modern medicine, those of which many of us have already enjoyed or perhaps will in the future.

However, I see the life changing results that have come from adult stem cell research, and can't help but compare these to the lack of results we have seen from embryonic stem cell research which has not provided the concrete benefits to patients that we have seen otherwise. We should not discount the possibilities surrounding the discoveries that lie ahead within medical research, but, since we have seen results from alternative types of stem cell research, not involving embryonic stem cells, should we spend federal money on researching something that has yielded few positive results?

I have seen positive results from the research we have done in the area of adult stem cell research. In fact, an overwhelming proportion of privately funded research is going towards adult stem cell research.

This is a strong indication of what researchers think regarding the direction of future stem cell research. Adult stem cells and other similar alternatives have helped thousands of patients throughout the world, while the results of embryonic stem cell research have not helped any one patient yet.

I have seen the proven results and lives that have benefited from the research done on adult stem cells. It has been proven that the results of this research have created procedures that have assisted in saving lives, and curing illnesses. Advancements are constantly being made in science, medical research, and technology and so this issue is constantly changing. Just look at how far we have come in the last year on this issue. This debate is not going to be over after this vote, tomorrow but rather the debate is just beginning. However, at this time, I feel that the taxpayer's money should be spent in places where we yield the best results for patients, and currently this is in the area of adult stem cell research.

It is my hope, Mr. President, that we continue to see monumental steps made in medical research, stem cell and otherwise, and that we find cures to diseases such as juvenile diabetes, cancer, sickle cell anemia, and Alzheimer's disease.

I yield the floor.

http://thomas.loc.gov/

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