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Amending Public Health Service Act with Respect to National Foundation for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Location: Washington, DC


AMENDING PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE ACT WITH RESPECT TO NATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION -- (House of Representatives - July 11, 2006)

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Mr. LINDER. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of House passage for S. 655 and I urge my colleagues on both sides to join me in supporting the measure.

S. 655 closely mirrors legislation I introduced in the House last year, H.R. 1569. Both of these measures seek the same objective, to make very few limited changes to current Federal law governing the National Foundation for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In light of the fact that the U.S. Senate approved an amended version of S. 655 last July, I worked with my friend and colleague from Georgia (Mr. Deal), the chairman of the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health, to bring this measure to the floor today. I commend him for all of his work on this project, and express my appreciation for his support and leadership on health policy matters, including the CDC.

The legislation before us today, S. 655, would allow research fellows at the Foundation to remain in their positions for as long as their privately funded fellowships remain in effect. Currently, such fellowships must end after 2 years.

Second, the bill gives the director of the CDC authority to provide facilities, utilities and support services to the Foundation, provided that doing so furthers the CDC's public health mission.

Third, it would allow the Secretary of HHS, on behalf of the CDC, to make up to $1.25 million in funding available to the Foundation each year, an increase from the current law level of $500,000.

This bill passed the Senate by unanimous consent and has moved quickly through Energy and Commerce. The important part is the raising the funding part. For every dollar in public funds, the Foundation generates $30 in nongovernmental funding from the private sector. For example, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals paid $30,000 for an Asian rotavirus surveillance network meeting.

Kaiser Foundation Hospitals gave $2 million to emergency preparedness and the response fund.

Sanofi Pasteur paid $1.5 million for a meningcoccal vaccine study.

Wyeth Pharmaceuticals paid $3 million for a study of the blood inhibitors in hemophilia patients. These were of parochial interest to these corporations, but of general interest to the public health, and have been helpful to all of us.

In short, the Foundation leverages a modest amount of public money and uses that to generate a large amount of private nongovernmental support for the CDC and its mission. Passing S. 655

will help enable the Foundation to surpass this exemplary record of achievement.

Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill.

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