Search Form
First, enter a politician or zip code
Now, choose a category

Public Statements

Message from the Senate

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC


MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE

BREAK IN TRANSCRIPT

Mr. SMITH of New Jersey. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, the overwhelming majority of U.S. forces have performed their mission in an exemplary, professional fashion and deserve both our praise and profound thanks.

Mr. Speaker, we all know that Iraq remains a dangerous place today because hate-filled fanatic, perhaps even psychotic, mass murderers bomb and shoot innocent men, women, and children. The terrorists have a morbid fascination with all things violent. There is nothing whatsoever benign or noble or praiseworthy about these people. They are mass murderers.

If left unchecked, the terrorists would impose dictatorship once again on Iraq and Afghanistan, which would result in more mass killings, systematic torture, rampant fear, political prisoners, and an end to freedom and liberty.

While I respect the right of those who criticize our Iraq policy and our solidarity with the Iraqi people, I do remain deeply disappointed that those who protest U.S. policy outside of this Chamber seldom, if ever, criticize the terrorists. No harsh, mocking words of condemnation of George W. Bush is left unspoken. You hear it on TV, talk shows, and at war protests; but no such righteous anger is directed at the mass murderers who blow up our soldiers or incinerate pious worshippers in prayer or kidnap, torture and kill humanitarian workers.

American coalition soldiers in Iraq are peacemakers who have the toughest job in the world. They are peacemakers who put their own lives at risk to create sufficient space and order so that democracy and respect for human rights can grow and peace can be established.

I want our soldiers to come home and to come home soon, but that fervent hope must be tempered with reality on the ground and what our commanders on the ground think best. To leave prematurely or pursuant to an arbitrarily arrived at deadline established by Members of Congress may unwittingly put more lives at risk and strengthen the fanaticism and hope of the terrorists.

Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H. Res. 861.

The Hyde resolution honors--and profoundly thanks--all those American, Iraqi, Afghan, and coalition forces who have so courageously fought the war on terror, especially those who have lost their lives in the defense of freedom.

Our war dead--and wounded--define anew what it means to be brave and honorable and good.

And our condolences and prayers go to the families of the fallen.

The overwhelming majority of U.S. forces have performed their missions in an exemplary, professional fashion--and deserve both our praise and profound thanks.

We all know that Iraq remains a dangerous place today because hate-filled, fanatic--perhaps even psychotic--mass murderers bomb and shoot innocent men, women, and children. In the past their thugs were in the government suites and Hussein's opulent palaces--now some remain in the streets--hopefully not for long.

The terrorists have a morbid fascination with all things violent. There is nothing whatsoever benign or noble or praiseworthy about these people.

They are mass murderers.

If left unchecked, the terrorists would impose dictatorship once again on Iraq and Afghanistan, which would result in more mass killing, systematic torture, rampant fear, political prisoners and an end to freedom and liberty.

While I respect the right of those who criticize American policy and our solidarity with the Iraqi people, I remain deeply disappointed that many of those who protest U.S. policy outside of this chamber seldom--if ever--criticize the terrorists.

No harsh, mocking thoughts of condemnation of President George W. Bush are left unspoken. You hear it on TV and radio talk shows and at war protests, but no such angst is directed at the mass murderers who blow up our soldiers or incinerate pious worshipers at prayer in Mosques or who kidnap, torture, and kill humanitarian workers trying to save and enhance the lives of the vulnerable.

American and coalition soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan are peacemakers and they have the toughest assignment in the world. They are peacemakers who put their own lives at risk to create sufficient space and order so that democracy, respect for human rights, and peace can be established and grow.

I want our soldiers to come home--and soon.

But that fervent hope must be tempered with realities on the ground. What do our military commanders on the ground think? To leave prematurely or pursuant to an arbitrarily arrived at deadline established by members of Congress may unwittingly put more lives at risk and strengthen the fanaticism and hopes of the terrorists.

Still, public debate on exit strategy is important--even necessary--because it puts pressure on us all to figure out how to prudently accomplish redeployment and it puts constructive pressure on Iraqi leaders to move more quickly to take ownership of their own security.

BREAK IN TRANSCRIPT

http://thomas.loc.gov

Skip to top
Back to top