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Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agendcies Appropriations Act, 2007

Location: Washington, DC



Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself 1 1/2 minutes.

I certainly appreciate the intent of what the gentlemen are trying to accomplish. I have a lot of sympathy for it, but I oppose the American Farm Bureau at this time. The reason is, we do need to identify those animals who are involved in the food chain for human consumption.

Yet, at the same time, because our language, we worked very closely with the authorizing committee, requires that before it is implemented that we have comments in the Federal Registry which at that time people can weed out those nonessential animals, because I don't want a national bureaucracy knowing about every single animal that I own or a rancher or farmer may own.

During that comment period, it certainly would be my intention, and I think most of us on the authorizing and on the appropriating committee, to make sure what you are saying is correct. So, at this point, I also want to point out that we are delaying any of these funds to be available to the USDA until it publishes the advance notice of proposed rulemaking about the plan. We are doing everything we can in a public comment period.


Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I want to urge a ``no'' vote and say that we are going to join Mr. Paul in fighting a new bureaucracy and also to weed out an excessive burden on small farmers and too much information to the Federal Government. That is why we have delayed the funding of this until the advanced notice for proposed rulemaking has been filed, and we are going to work on a bipartisan basis to get that right. So please vote ``no.''


Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, if the gentleman will yield, I want to say on behalf of the Chair, we are ready to accept this amendment. I know you have worked very hard on this facility, and I know your passion for it. The committee accepts the amendment.


Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I certainly applaud all of the efforts of Mr. Chabot for cutting spending and so forth. And yet I find myself on the opposite side with him on this. The reason is that Tom Friedman has written a very famous book right now called, The World is Flat. And the world is flat, and it is flat because we are in a global economy, where a farmer in the Philippines or in Indonesia or in Russia can compete with a farmer from Ohio or Georgia, just as easy as if he was in the same country.

What the MAP program does is it helps sell our goods overseas. Two or three hours ago when we opened up this bill, I said that one of our farmers' big challenges right now is foreign subsidies competing against American ag products. Well, quite often, the World Trade Organization seems to allow foreign farmers to have subsidies but not American farmers.

Mr. Chairman, this is one tool that helps us combat that. I would point out that the ag exports at this point are over $64 billion, the highest level in history. And one reason is this, is because the Market Access Program has shown our farmers, whether you are growing Vidalia onions or peanuts or strawberries, how to sell your goods overseas.

And for every $1 billion in sales overseas, there is about 16,000 domestic jobs that are created. In fiscal year 2005, almost 1 million Americans had jobs that depend on U.S. American agricultural exports. MAP is an integral part of that program. And yet it is not just for farmers alone, here, come get your check. They have to contribute up to 50 percent of the program's cost. And since 1992, the MAP participants have increased their contributions from 30 percent to 166 percent.

I urge my colleagues to oppose the Chabot Amendment.


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