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The Official Truth Squad

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Location: Washington, DC


THE OFFICIAL TRUTH SQUAD -- (House of Representatives - March 08, 2006)

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Mrs. BLACKBURN. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Georgia for yielding and for his leadership and the energy that he is putting into being certain that we communicate the message from our Republican agenda. Thank you for this, and thank you and the freshman class for tackling this project and being certain that we are talking about the things that are happening in our economy and the good news that is there to share.

A couple of points that I would like to make tonight as we are talking about the economy and the growth in the economy is Mr. Westmoreland was just talking about leaving more money with American families, with all of our constituents, with their families. That is what one of our goals is, to be certain that we take less from those paychecks, so that the family, when they sit down to work out their budget, they have more that they are working with.

I think that it is an absolute travesty that the single largest item in a family's budget is taxes. How did we get to this, that the largest item a family is left with is taxes? More than food, housing, clothing, transportation and education, more than lessons for children. How did we get to the point that it is taxes?

How wonderful that we could make decisions in 2003, we had the opportunity to vote to roll back some of those taxes so that we take less. It is time that we end the Federal Government having first right of refusal on your paycheck and let you and your family have that paycheck and make those decisions of what to do with those hard-earned dollars.

When we talk about women's issues, all issues are women's issues. Economic issues are definitely women's issues.

One of the things that I hear regularly, wherever I am in this great and wonderful land, is that wherever you have the fastest-growing sector of that town, of that county, of that area's economy, most likely it is going to be women-owned small businesses, and I think that is so exciting that that entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well.

One of the first issues that women will raise with me are taxes, the overburdensome nature of taxes, the cost of compliance for small businesses, how they would love to be growing that business, but with the taxes, with compliance costs, then they have less to spend in growing that business.

So as we look at extending our tax reductions, as we look at being certain we do not raise taxes, that they do not go up, that we hold what we have in those tax reductions, it is so important that we realize that that benefits so many American women who are starting those businesses and are realizing the American dream and those gifts and opportunities and prosperities for their themselves and for their families.

Mr. PRICE of Georgia. I think that is such an incredibly important point that you just made, and that is not to raise taxes.

What most of my constituents do not understand or appreciate is that Congress has to act in order for the current tax decreases, the current tax cuts, to continue, and that if we do nothing, if the other side is successful in making it so that Congress is inactive and does not do anything, then a tax increase will take effect; is that not the case?

Mrs. BLACKBURN. If the gentleman will yield, yes, indeed, that is the case. You know what we are trying to do is hold the line. We are trying to hold the line, and to keep them from pushing tax increases over that line, and that is our goal, to hold these reductions we have been able to put in place, to be certain that we do not see taxes raised on our families, on our small businesses.

It is so important for these small businesses. I had a young lady in my office this week, and it is such a great story. She said, Mrs. Blackburn, 4 years ago I was working at McDonald's; I thought, well, I will never get that higher education. She attended a career college, and she gave me her business card where she is working.

I hear story after story after story of this, of women who have moved back in to see their educational dreams come true, to get that degree, to get that diploma, to complete that trade school and move into either working for themselves or working with someone else, but having that job, earning that paycheck, and they all want to be certain. We have a focus on what we are going to do about keeping their taxes low, what we are going to do about creating, creating the right environment so that jobs growth can take place.

I know that you join me in looking forward to the numbers that are going to come out on Friday when we are going to see about jobs growth for this first quarter of the year, and everybody is excited about looking at this because we know that this economy is on a good, solid track. We are seeing plenty of help in it, and much of it has to do with reducing regulation, reducing taxation and putting the focus on what we do to be certain that we have a healthy economy.

One of the things we talk about so often in my district, because I have a district where we have a lot of small businesses, small businesses are the number one employer. Upwards of 90 percent of all the jobs are attributed to small business growth, and my constituents, they keep me honest, and I love it because they remind me regularly that government does not create jobs, that they are the ones that are creating jobs. It is our job to be certain that the environment is right for those jobs to be created, and I am always running around with these little plastic pens with somebody's logo on it. I pick these up from employers in my district, and it reminds me these are the guys that are putting the pen to the paper, and they are the ones that are making jobs growth happen in our district.

And I will yield to the gentleman for this poster which tells the story.

Mr. PRICE of Georgia. It really does. A picture really is worth 1,000 or a million words, certainly, and this one certainly is. In fact, it is worth 4.73 million words, because every one of those 4.73 million new jobs is demonstrated on this picture here, on this graph here, from January 2002 all the way to January 2006. You see the trend that happened during this administration, during the Republican leadership and what happened when it crossed the line with tax decreases, the tax cuts you talked about.

Mrs. BLACKBURN. So many of these jobs, sometimes I have people say, tell me where these are being created, tell me where these jobs are being created.

What we have seen happen is that we are into the knowledge economy. We are into a technology-based economy, and we are seeing this jobs growth in different areas, and it is so wonderful because so many of the individuals that live in our districts are jumping in there. They are getting jobs retraining, they are getting computer skills retraining, and they are working in a million different careers that they never, ever thought would be available to them.

And as we are watching the technology growth in our districts, all across this country, it is small business manufacturing industries that are growing. Their numbers are better than they have been in 10 years. I think that is such a sign of encouragement. Or whether they are working in service industry-related jobs, what we are seeing is new jobs, in new industries, which tell us that

an economic renaissance is on that horizon. It is imperative that we make certain we do not see tax increases and that we do not see regulation increases and we keep an eye on having that right environment take place.

I thank the gentleman for yielding.

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