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Public Statements

Providing that the House of Representatives will Focus on Removing Barriers to Competitiveness of the United States Economy

By:
Date:
Location: Washington, DC


PROVIDING THAT THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES WILL FOCUS ON REMOVING BARRIERS TO COMPETITIVENESS OF THE UNITED STATES ECONOMY -- (House of Representatives - July 12, 2005)

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Mr. UDALL of Colorado. Mr. Speaker, I am not voting for this resolution, because I think it does not make a constructive contribution to the problems facing our country and the national economy.

The resolution says that trade restrictions and inequality are barriers to keeping and creating jobs in the United States--but it does nothing about them, just as it does nothing to make it easier for Americans looking for work to find good jobs.

The resolution says that bureaucratic red tape is a barrier to economic progress, but it does nothing to reduce that barrier or to require the Bush Administration to exercise leadership in reducing red tape.

The resolution says there is need for more innovation and investment, but it offers nothing substantive to promote innovation or to encourage more productive investment.

The resolution correctly says there is a need to overcome barriers to health care security, but it does nothing to help the millions of Americans who lack health insurance or to make good health care more affordable.

The resolution says we need to promote lifelong learning, but is silent as to how to go about achieving that desirable result.

The resolution mentions taxes and the complexity of the tax laws, but provides no useful suggestions as to how to reduce that complexity or to promote tax fairness.

The resolution complains about ``lawsuit abuse'' and seems to support ``litigation management,'' but says nothing about the extent to which the courts can protect individual rights and the essential role of law in our society.

And while the resolution correctly says there is a need for greater energy self-sufficiency and security, it does nothing about it. While that actually is an improvement over the energy-policy bill the House passed earlier this year, with its many wrong-headed provisions, it falls far short of what is needed.

In short, this resolution is not serious. It deserves neither the time consumed in debating it nor approval by the House. I will not vote for it.

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